Somalie 2020

Attentat à la voiture piégée à Mogadiscio

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Somali women chant slogans and hold placards written in Somali  » No more Explosions » and  » Silly criminal is Dangerous » as they protest against Somali Islamist group Al-Shabaab at General Kahiye Police Academey, for security reasons, in Mogadishu on January 2, 2020. Al-Shabaab Islamist militants have claimed responsibility for the massive car bomb attack on December 28, 2019, in the Somali capital Mogadishu that killed 81 people, including two Turkish citizens. Among the dead were 16 students from the private Banadir university whose bus was passing through the crossroads as the bomb detonated. For the first time, Al-Shabaab apologised to the civilian victims of the attack, which it justified as necessary in fight against the Somali State and its foreign backers.

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Somali women chant slogans and hold placards written in Somali « No more Explosions » and « Silly criminal is Dangerous » as they protest against Somali Islamist group Al-Shabaab at General Kahiye Police Academey, for security reasons, in Mogadishu on January 2, 2020. Al-Shabaab Islamist militants have claimed responsibility for the massive car bomb attack on December 28, 2019, in the Somali capital Mogadishu that killed 81 people, including two Turkish citizens. Among the dead were 16 students from the private Banadir university whose bus was passing through the crossroads as the bomb detonated. For the first time, Al-Shabaab apologised to the civilian victims of the attack, which it justified as necessary in fight against the Somali State and its foreign backers.

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Mohamed Ibrahim Mohamud, 35, father of eight children, touches his broken leg on a bed after being injured in the bombing attack on December 28, 2019 at Madina hospital in Mogadishu, Somalia, on December 31, 2019. Al-Shabaab Islamist militants have claimed responsibility for the massive car bomb on December 28 in the Somali capital Mogadishu that killed 81 people, including two Turkish citizens.

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Six children of Mumin Malkad, 60, who was killed with his other son in the bombing attack on December 28, pose for the photographer at their makeshift home on the outskirts of Mogadishu, Somalia, on December 31, 2019. Al-Shabaab Islamist militants have claimed responsibility for the massive car bomb on December 28 in the Somali capital Mogadishu that killed 81 people, including two Turkish citizens.

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A Somali woman holding her younger brother poses at her makeshift home after her father was killed by the bombing attack on December 28, 2019, in Mogadishu, Somalia, on December 31, 2019. Al-Shabaab Islamist militants have claimed responsibility for the massive car bomb on December 28 in the Somali capital Mogadishu that killed 81 people, including two Turkish citizens.

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Nurses help a wounded child, that was wounded in the December 28, 2019 car bomb explosion in Mogadishu, before being evacuated to Turkey for medical treatment, at the Adan Adde international airport in Mogadishu on December 29, 2019. A Turkish military plane landed in Mogadishu on December 29, 2019, to evacuate about 15 people seriously injured in the attack that killed 79 people on December 28, 2019, in the Somali capital, which was frequently attacked by Islamist insurgents.
The plane was also carrying medicines to treat the 100 or so people injured in th car bomb attack in a busy Mogadishu neighbourhood, which has become the deadliest attack in two years.

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A wounded girl, from the December 28, 2019 car bombing in Mogadishu, is carried on a hospital bed to a Turkish Air Force aircraft for medical evacuation to Turkey at the Adan Adde international airport in Mogadishu on December 29, 2019. A Turkish military plane landed in Mogadishu on December 29, 2019, to evacuate about 15 people seriously injured in the attack that killed 79 people on December 28, 2019, in the Somali capital, which was frequently attacked by Islamist insurgents.
The plane was also carrying medicines to treat the 100 or so people injured in th car bomb attack in a busy Mogadishu neighbourhood, which has become the deadliest attack in two years.

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Turkish and Somali officials pray for the victims that died and others that were wounded in the December 28, 2019 bomb explosion, at the Adan Adde international airport in Mogadishu on December 29, 2019. A Turkish military plane landed in Mogadishu on December 29, 2019, to evacuate about 15 people seriously injured in the attack that killed 79 people on December 28, 2019, in the Somali capital, which was frequently attacked by Islamist insurgents.
The plane was also carrying medicines to treat the 100 or so people injured in th car bomb attack in a busy Mogadishu neighbourhood, which has become the deadliest attack in two years.

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Nurses holds wounded children, that were wounded in the December 28, 2019 car bomb explosion in Mogadishu, before being evacuated to Turkey for medical treatment, at the Adan Adde international airport in Mogadishu on December 29, 2019. A Turkish military plane landed in Mogadishu on December 29, 2019, to evacuate about 15 people seriously injured in the attack that killed 79 people on December 28, 2019, in the Somali capital, which was frequently attacked by Islamist insurgents.
The plane was also carrying medicines to treat the 100 or so people injured in th car bomb attack in a busy Mogadishu neighbourhood, which has become the deadliest attack in two years.

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Rescue workers from Somalia and Turkey are carrying a wounded woman on a stretcher , that was wounded in the December 28, 2019 car bomb explosion in Mogadishu, before being evacuated to Turkey for medical treatment, at the Adan Adde international airport in Mogadishu on December 29, 2019. A Turkish military plane landed in Mogadishu on December 29, 2019, to evacuate about 15 people seriously injured in the attack that killed 79 people on December 28, 2019, in the Somali capital, which was frequently attacked by Islamist insurgents.
The plane was also carrying medicines to treat the 100 or so people injured in th car bomb attack in a busy Mogadishu neighbourhood, which has become the deadliest attack in two years.

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An aircraft of the Turkish Air Force is parked to support a medical evacuation, of people who got wounded in the December 28, 2019 car bomb that exploded in Mogadishu, to Turkey at the Adan Adde international airport in Mogadishu on December 29, 2019. A Turkish military plane landed in Mogadishu on December 29, 2019, to evacuate about 15 people seriously injured in the attack that killed 79 people on December 28, 2019, in the Somali capital, which was frequently attacked by Islamist insurgents.
The plane was also carrying medicines to treat the 100 or so people injured in th car bomb attack in a busy Mogadishu neighbourhood, which has become the deadliest attack in two years.

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A wounded woman, from the December 28, 2019 car bombing in Mogadishu, is loaded from an ambulance to be taken to a Turkish Air Force aircraft for medical evacuation to Turkey at the Adan Adde international airport in Mogadishu on December 29, 2019. A Turkish military plane landed in Mogadishu on December 29, 2019, to evacuate about 15 people seriously injured in the attack that killed 79 people on December 28, 2019, in the Somali capital, which was frequently attacked by Islamist insurgents.
The plane was also carrying medicines to treat the 100 or so people injured in th car bomb attack in a busy Mogadishu neighbourhood, which has become the deadliest attack in two years.

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A wounded man sits outside of emergency unit at Mogadisghu’s Madina Hospital, in Mogadishu, on December 28, 2019. A massive car bomb exploded in a busy area of the Somali capital Mogadishu on December 28, 2019, leaving more than 20 people dead.

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The wreckage of a car that was destroyed during the car bomb attack is seen in Mogadishu, on December 28, 2019. A massive car bomb exploded in a busy area of Mogadishu on December 28, 2019, leaving at least 76 people dead, many of them university students.

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Somali soldiers secure the scene at a car bombing attack site in Mogadishu, on December 28, 2019. A massive car bomb exploded in a busy area of Mogadishu on December 28, 2019, leaving at least 76 people dead, many of them university students.

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Nurses carry a person, that was wounded during a car bombing attack, at the Madina Hospital in Mogadishu, on December 28, 2019. A massive car bomb exploded in a busy area of Mogadishu on December 28, 2019, leaving at least 76 people dead, many of them university students.

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A soldier is seen next to the wreckage of car that was damaged during the car bomb that exploded in Mogadishu that killed more than 20 people is photographed in Mogadishu on December 28, 2019. A massive car bomb exploded in a busy area of the Somali capital Mogadishu on December 28, 2019, leaving more than 20 people dead.

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Somali police officers secure the area at a car bombing attack site in Mogadishu, on December 28, 2019. A massive car bomb exploded in a busy area of Mogadishu on December 28, 2019, leaving at least 76 people dead, many of them university students.

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A Somali woman reacts as victims from a car bombing attack are brought to the Madina Hospital in Mogadishu, on December 28, 2019. A massive car bomb exploded in a busy area of Mogadishu on December 28, 2019, leaving at least 76 people dead, many of them university students.

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The wreckage of a car that was destroyed during the car bomb that exploded in Mogadishu that killed more than 20 people is photographed in Mogadishu on December 28, 2019. A massive car bomb exploded in a busy area of the Somali capital Mogadishu on December 28, 2019, leaving more than 20 people dead.

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Le président somalien Mohamed Abdullahi Farmaajo

Somalie : cinq questions sur l’attentat meurtrier de Mogadiscio

Un nouvel attentat mortel a endeuillé la Somalie. Au moins 81 personnes sont mortes, samedi 28 décembre, dans une attaque à la voiture piégée, au cœur de Mogadiscio. C’est l’attaque la plus meurtrière depuis deux ans dans la capitale somalienne, régulièrement frappée par les shebab, qui tentent de renverser le gouvernement somalien depuis une dizaine d’années.

Que s’est-il passé ?
Des voitures calcinées, un sol jonché de débris et de corps… Les images de l’attaque sont impressionnantes. Comme le raconte RFI, la voiture piégée a explosé vers 7h40, en pleine heure de pointe, à un carrefour très fréquenté de la capitale où se trouvent un point de contrôle et un centre de collecte des impôts. « J’ai vu la voiture passer le check point et exploser immédiatement. J’ai couru et je me suis caché derrière un bloc du check point », raconte un témoin à la BBC (en anglais). « Tout ce que j’ai pu voir, ce sont des corps éparpillés, certains brûlés au point d’être méconnaissables », selon un autre témoin, qui se trouvait non loin du lieu de l’attentat, cité par l’AFP.

Quel est le bilan ?
Un premier bilan de 79 morts a d’abord été communiqué, mais il s’est alourdi à 81 victimes tuées, lundi. « Deux autres personnes ont succombé à leurs blessures. L’une d’entre elles figurait parmi les blessés graves qui ont été transportés en Turquie hier (dimanche) et une autre victime est morte dans un des hôpitaux de Mogadiscio », a déclaré à l’AFP le porte-parole du ministère de l’Information, Ismail Muktar.

Au moins 16 des personnes tuées étaient des étudiants de l’université privée Banadir de Mogadiscio. Ils circulaient à bord d’un bus, lorsque la voiture piégée a explosé, dans une zone où la circulation est très dense. « Ce qui s’est passé aujourd’hui est horrible », a déclaré à l’AFP un étudiant, qui s’est précipité à l’hôpital après avoir appris l’attentat. « J’ai compté les cadavres de 16 étudiants et étudiantes, certains d’entre eux avaient des parties du corps sectionnées ». L’université a annoncé cinq jours de fermeture. « C’est un jour noir, c’est un jour où les parents qui ont envoyé leurs enfants étudier en ont récupéré les corps », a déclaré le président de l’université, Mohamed Mohamud Hassan.

Deux ressortissants turcs figurent également parmi les victimes. Le gouvernement turc a affrété un avion « chargé d’équipement (…), afin d’apporter une aide d’urgence à nos frères somaliens blessés dans la méprisable attaque terroriste ». Il est reparti dimanche avec à son bord seize blessés graves, qui vont être soignés dans des hôpitaux turcs.

Plus de 120 personnes ont en outre été blessées et une dizaine sont encore portées disparues, lundi.

L’attaque a-t-elle été revendiquée ?
Non. Elle survient dans un contexte marqué par de multiples actions meurtrières menées par des islamistes shebab affiliés à Al-Qaïda. Ces insurgés ont juré la perte du gouvernement somalien, soutenu par la communauté internationale et les 20 000 hommes de la force de l’Union africaine en Somalie (Amisom). Chassés de Mogadiscio en 2011, ils ont perdu l’essentiel de leurs bastions, mais contrôlent toujours de vastes zones rurales, d’où ils mènent des opérations de guérilla et des attentats-suicides. On estime qu’ils comptent entre 5 000 et 9 000 combattants.

Les shebab ne revendiquent généralement pas les attentats faisant un grand nombre de victimes parmi la population civile, de peur de perdre le soutien dont ils jouissent encore auprès de certains Somaliens.

Il y a deux semaines, les shebab ont attaqué un hôtel de la capitale fréquenté par des responsables politiques, des officiers et des diplomates. Depuis 2015, 13 attentats en Somalie dont le bilan égale ou dépasse les 20 morts, dont onze à Mogadiscio, selon un décompte de l’AFP. Tous ont été commis à la voiture piégée. Le plus meurtrier de l’histoire de la Somalie s’est produit en octobre 2017, lorsque l’explosion d’un camion piégé à Mogadiscio a fait 512 morts et 295 blessés.

Comment réagissent les autorités ?
Le président somalien Mohamed Abdullahi Farmaajo a condamné l’attaque dans des déclarations diffusées par l’agence nationale de presse Sonna. « Cet ennemi s’emploie à mettre en œuvre la volonté destructrice du terrorisme international, ils n’ont jamais fait quoi que ce soit de positif pour notre pays, ils n’ont pas fait de route, jamais construit d’hôpitaux ni d’établissements d’éducation », a-t-il déclaré. « Tout ce qu’ils font, c’est détruire et tuer, et (les Somaliens) le savent bien ». Le secrétaire général de l’ONU Antonio Guterres a condamné l’attentat et déclaré dans un communiqué que « les auteurs de ce crime épouvantable doivent être traduits en justice ».

Les Etats-Unis ont aussi réagi. Présents en Somalie, les Américains y ont intensifié, depuis avril 2017, leurs frappes aériennes après l’extension, par le président Donald Trump, des pouvoirs donnés à l’armée américaine pour lancer des opérations antiterroristes. Dimanche, de nouvelles frappes, présentées comme une réponse à l’attentat, ont tué quatre miliciens islamistes shebab. « Ces frappes aériennes de précision visaient des miliciens shebab responsables d’actes terroristes contre des citoyens somaliens innocents en coordination avec Al-Qaïda », a déclaré dans un communiqué le commandement militaire américain pour l’Afrique (US Africa Command ou Africom).
Quelle est la situation dans le pays ?

Cette attaque intervient à quelques mois du retrait prévu des troupes de l’Union africaine, qui devaient pacifier le pays. Le 31 mai, l’Amisom doit terminer sa mission et transférer progressivement la responsabilité de la sécurité nationale aux forces somaliennes. « L’objectif étant qu’elles prennent la direction des opérations d’ici décembre 2021 », indiquait l’ONU en mai. Sur le plan politique, l’année 2020 est cruciale pour la Somalie : le pays doit tenir des élections législatives, les premières au suffrage universel depuis 1969.